DEAN ARRINDELL

Former stay-at-home dad. Writes about manhood, politics, pop culture, race and a bit of Britain.
Having crumpets for the first time (with tea, of course).

Having crumpets for the first time (with tea, of course).

Part of the fireworks finale!

The last bit of sunlight before tonight’s fireworks.

The last bit of sunlight before tonight’s fireworks.

Please! Please! Please.. be a good movie! Or be Super Bad!

Please! Please! Please.. be a good movie! Or be Super Bad!

First time having this organic gin. Pretty good! #FarmersGin

First time having this organic gin. Pretty good! #FarmersGin

The young man getting into the spirit of the Memorial Day parade. (at Town of Ridgefield)

The young man getting into the spirit of the Memorial Day parade. (at Town of Ridgefield)

Margaret Atwood asked a male friend why men feel threatened by women. “They are afraid women will laugh at them. She asked a group of women the same of men. “We’re afraid of being killed.

—The mass killing at UCSB is awful and disturbing (via jessbennett)

The creek in front of #OwlsRidge.

The creek in front of #OwlsRidge.

Manhattan Bridge from DUMBO Brooklyn. (From when I was there a few weeks ago.)

Manhattan Bridge from DUMBO Brooklyn. (From when I was there a few weeks ago.)


When it comes to race-relations dramas—and slavery narratives, in particular—the white savior has become one of Hollywood’s most reliably offensive clichés. The black servants of The Help needed a perky, progressive Emma Stone to shed light on their plight; the football bruiser in The Blind Side couldn’t have done it without fiery Sandra Bullock; the black athletes in Cool Runnings and The Air Up There needed the guidance of their white coach; and in 12 Years A Slave, Solomon Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, is liberated at the eleventh hour by a Jesus-looking Brad Pitt (in a classic Deus Ex Machina).

Keli Goff in The Daily Beast the white savior in movies and how the film Belle (Sarah Gadon and Gugu Mbatha-Raw pictured) bucks that trend.

When it comes to race-relations dramas—and slavery narratives, in particular—the white savior has become one of Hollywood’s most reliably offensive clichés. The black servants of The Help needed a perky, progressive Emma Stone to shed light on their plight; the football bruiser in The Blind Side couldn’t have done it without fiery Sandra Bullock; the black athletes in Cool Runnings and The Air Up There needed the guidance of their white coach; and in 12 Years A Slave, Solomon Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, is liberated at the eleventh hour by a Jesus-looking Brad Pitt (in a classic Deus Ex Machina).

Keli Goff in The Daily Beast the white savior in movies and how the film Belle (Sarah Gadon and Gugu Mbatha-Raw pictured) bucks that trend.