DEAN ARRINDELL

Former stay-at-home dad. Writes about manhood, politics, pop culture, race and a bit of Britain.
Manhattan Bridge from DUMBO Brooklyn. (From when I was there a few weeks ago.)

Manhattan Bridge from DUMBO Brooklyn. (From when I was there a few weeks ago.)


When it comes to race-relations dramas—and slavery narratives, in particular—the white savior has become one of Hollywood’s most reliably offensive clichés. The black servants of The Help needed a perky, progressive Emma Stone to shed light on their plight; the football bruiser in The Blind Side couldn’t have done it without fiery Sandra Bullock; the black athletes in Cool Runnings and The Air Up There needed the guidance of their white coach; and in 12 Years A Slave, Solomon Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, is liberated at the eleventh hour by a Jesus-looking Brad Pitt (in a classic Deus Ex Machina).

Keli Goff in The Daily Beast the white savior in movies and how the film Belle (Sarah Gadon and Gugu Mbatha-Raw pictured) bucks that trend.

When it comes to race-relations dramas—and slavery narratives, in particular—the white savior has become one of Hollywood’s most reliably offensive clichés. The black servants of The Help needed a perky, progressive Emma Stone to shed light on their plight; the football bruiser in The Blind Side couldn’t have done it without fiery Sandra Bullock; the black athletes in Cool Runnings and The Air Up There needed the guidance of their white coach; and in 12 Years A Slave, Solomon Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, is liberated at the eleventh hour by a Jesus-looking Brad Pitt (in a classic Deus Ex Machina).

Keli Goff in The Daily Beast the white savior in movies and how the film Belle (Sarah Gadon and Gugu Mbatha-Raw pictured) bucks that trend.

Raise your hand if you can identify anything about Generation X. So many books and articles published in recent years tend to mention Gen X only in passing as a small, insignificant, “in-between” cohort leaving few lasting impressions. Instead, we hear about the Millennial state of mind, and how the Millennial-Baby Boomer relationship appears to be flourishing and providing all the nourishment the current generational identity checks seem to need.

I’ve been wondering this for while: Where is Generation X? I hear a lot about Millennials and Baby Boomers in the news and in popular culture, but rarely hear anything about people like me born between between the early 1960s and 1980. Why is this? Does it matter that writers, editors and producers aren’t obsessing over Gen-Xers like they are about Millennials and Boomers? 

I’ll explore these questions and others about Generation X in the next few weeks. 

Meanwhile, read the rest of Christine Henseler’s article in The Huffington Post.

Time Management

Four days in and I’m already struggling.

It’s not that I wasn’t creative today. I worked on a video about a stroll I took in the DUMBO area of Brooklyn. That wouldn’t normally be a problem, but I want to put music in it - music that I created. That’s not one of my strengths at the moment. So, it’s taking some time, which means I didn’t post it today.

This experiment will be a good way to manage creative time between three types of content. Quick content like Instagram or Twitter (The latter won’t be counted in EDIM. I do consider it content, though.); Content that takes a few minutes to a few hours to create, like this blog post; and content like videos or songs that take several days to conceive and create.

So wisely using my free time - what little of it there is - to publish quality content every day will be a challenge. I don’t want to end the month with 28 Instagram’s, two blogs posts and one video.

Old pickup

Old pickup

Time to go home. (at Grand Central Station)

Time to go home. (at Grand Central Station)

Every Day In May

I haven’t posted here in a very long time. In fact, I haven’t done much of anything online in the last couple of months. I essentially took a break from Twitter in April. There’s been nothing new on my Daddy blog for months. And while I posted two videos so far this year (two more than last year), I feel like that small amount of momentum has faded away. With the exception Instagram, I’ve been largely silent online.

Except for work!

At my current job, I post at least one blog a day - usually more. I help produce videos every day with a talented team of people. And I tweet multiple times a day. I create a lot content 5 days a week.

It sounds silly, but I realized I can create a lot of content if I put my mind to it. So why don’t I make a little more content for myself?

And since it’s the start of a new month, why don’t I do it every day this month?

So that’s what I’m going to do. It sounds gimmicky. Ok, it is gimmicky, but it’s not just test whether I can post something every day of the month. The idea is to force myself to be creative. I might post something small like an Instagram picture, or a couple of lines about something I see in a magazine. Or a post could be more involved like a video or some music.

The idea is to force myself to constantly think and create. As I turned 40, I realized that I find joy in making things. I like the process of having an idea, molding it (even if it’s just adding a filter and a caption), then seeing it come to fruition. It’s very satisfying to create something that wasn’t there before.

So “Every day in May” sounds gimmicky, but there’s something behind it.

..And it rhymes.

The story - in video form - about how I mistakenly left my shoes on the train and.. well, thanks Metro-North and MTA.




Mashable takes a look at the new Jaguar F-Type, the company’s first sports car in 50 years. It’s priced from $69,000 to $92,000. This firesand orange model shown here has a 5-liter supercharged V-8 engine that puts out 495hp.
More pics are here.

Mashable takes a look at the new Jaguar F-Type, the company’s first sports car in 50 years. It’s priced from $69,000 to $92,000. This firesand orange model shown here has a 5-liter supercharged V-8 engine that puts out 495hp.

More pics are here.